The Foundation

Southwest renewal foundation in highpoint, nc

Making our community a better place

Southwest Renewal Foundation started as a grassroots working group in the spring of 2011. The group incorporated in November 2011 and became an officially registered business in North Carolina. In May 2012, SWRF became a 501(C)3 Community Development Non-Profit Foundation. At the center of the state of North Carolina and mid-way along the eastern coast of the United States, Southwest High Point is located in the center of High Point’s home furnishings and fabric market districts, spreading out 2.08 square miles and 1331 acres. Southwest High Point has excellent roads, utilities, and fiber optics, with historic buildings for restoration and raw land available for new construction at affordable prices.  Southwest High Point is home to the city’s mass transit facilities, including passenger and freight rail, and is situated within 10 to 20 minutes of 4 interstates highways, a Federal Express Hub, an international airport, and the neighboring cities of Winston-Salem and Greensboro.

SWRF-Aerial View-min
SOUTHWEST RENEWAL FOUNDATION

Southwest High Point is located in the center of High Point’s home furnishings and fabric market districts, spreading out across 2.08 square miles and 1331 acres. It has excellent roads, utilities, and fiber optics, with historic buildings for restoration and raw land available for new construction at affordable prices. The neighborhood is home to the city’s mass transit facilities, including passenger and freight rail, and is situated within 10 to 20 minutes of four interstates highways, a Federal Express Hub, an international airport, 
and the neighboring cities of Winston-Salem and Greensboro. 

While High Point still maintains a strong identity as a center for furniture, home furnishings, and manufacturing, Southwest High Point has been strongly affected by job decline within these industries. Approximately 40 percent of Southwest High Point residents live below the poverty level, and many industrial and commercial buildings sit vacant or under-utilized. The 2007 High Point Core City Plan identified the Southwest as the most challenging area in the core city for revitalization. 

How WE BECAME WHAT WE ARE

Our Story

Spring, 2011

Founded

Started as a grassroots working group in the spring of 2011

Spring, 2011

November, 2011

Incorporated

Incorporated in November, 2011 and became an officially registered business.

November, 2011

May, 2012

501(c)3 Non-Profit

Officially became a 501(C)3 Non-Profit Foundation in May of 2012.

May, 2012

January 1, 2017

Important Event

Insert important event here. We can also add more events in between previous events, but we’d suggest keeping it to about 6 to 8 main key elements.

January 1, 2017

June, 2018

Greenway Heritage Project Begins

Was awarded a grant and officially began the Greenway Heritage project.

June, 2018

January 1, 2017

Important Event

Insert important event here. We can also add more events in between previous events, but we’d suggest keeping it to about 6 to 8 main key elements.

January 1, 2017
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Miles of Roads

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Businesses Supported

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Trees Planted

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Dedicated Members

SWRF by the numbers

Nearing our 10 Anniversary since SWRF began, here are some areas where we’ve contributed to.

Southwest Renewal Foundation of High Point

Our Leadership

Southwest High Point is located in the center of High Point’s home furnishings and fabric market districts, spreading out across 2.08 square miles and 1331 acres. It has excellent roads, utilities, and fiber optics, with historic buildings for restoration and raw land available for new construction at affordable prices. The neighborhood is home to the city’s mass transit facilities, including passenger and freight rail, and is situated within 10 to 20 minutes of four interstates highways, a Federal Express Hub, an international airport, and the neighboring cities of Winston-Salem and Greensboro. 

While High Point still maintains a strong identity as a center for furniture, home furnishings, and manufacturing, Southwest High Point has been strongly affected by job decline within these industries. Approximately 40 percent of Southwest High Point residents live below the poverty level, and many industrial and commercial buildings sit vacant or under-utilized. The 2007 High Point Core City Plan identified the Southwest as the most challenging area in the core city for revitalization. 

Dorothy Darr

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

High Point, NC, Southwest High Point Resident

Tony Collins

Board Co-Chair, President

Southside Neighborhood Association

Southwest Renewal Foundation

Dorothy "Dot" Kearns

BOARD CO-CHAIR

Former Chair, Guilford County Commissioner & High Point Citizen of the Year

View our full Leadership page